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Updated DBS guidance for employers

Updated DBS guidance for employers

The Home Office and the Disclosure and Barring Service have updated their guidance for employers on requesting DBS checks for potential employees.  The updated guidance includes some useful information on how employers, who might rely on a previously issued DBS check, can spot a counterfeit document.  It also gives guidance on the DBS’s online application form for basic checks, which was introduced back in January.  To view the new guidance, please click here.

Updated DBS guidance for employers

Notice of termination: are you sure your employee has been dismissed?

It is a common misconception amongst employers that notice of dismissal (or in cases where no notice is given, dismissal itself) will take effect on the date the employer writes to the employee to give them notice or inform them of the decision to dismiss. A long line of case law from the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) has established that this is not the case. Where, as is often the case, there is no contractual provision dealing with communication of notice, notice (or dismissal) will take effect on the date on which this is communicated to the employee. This means that, where an employer writes to an employee to give notice or inform them of their dismissal, it is only once the employee has personally taken delivery of the letter that the notice (or dismissal) will be deemed to have been received.
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Notice of termination: are you sure your employee has been dismissed?

‘Egregiously unfair’ dismissal costs employer £30,000

The employer, Michelin, dismissed their employee who was signed off with stress.
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‘Egregiously unfair’ dismissal costs employer £30,000

Managing a flexible workforce

With Christmas on the way (a busy time of year in many sectors – including hospitality) Big Hospitality has published our article on three key ways to manage a flexible workforce.  Please do have a read here – the principles can be applied to other types of flexible workforce too.

Managing a flexible workforce

Check the holiday calendar!

Failure to correctly plan pilots' holidays will result in Ryanair cancelling hundreds of flights over the next six weeks.
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Check the holiday calendar!

Suspension for alleged misconduct may be a breach of contract

In the recent case of Agoreyo v. London Borough of Lambeth [2017] EWHC 2019 (QB), the High Court has held that suspension as a "knee-jerk" reaction to an allegation of misconduct may in itself be sufficient to breach the implied contractual term of trust and confidence.
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Suspension for alleged misconduct may be a breach of contract

Self-employed contractors and the gig economy – keep watching this space!

Pimlico Plumbers has now been granted permission to appeal to the Supreme Court. The decision reached by the Supreme Court will be significant as the highest authority on the employment status of purportedly self-employed contractors. It is likely to have implications for the so-called "gig economy".
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Self-employed contractors and the gig economy – keep watching this space!

Slowly getting there – what might immigration look like after Brexit?

It may not have been accompanied by the usual pomp and circumstance, but the Queen’s speech yesterday did give us some further clues as to what the government has planned for EU nationals post-Brexit. In her speech, the Queen confirmed that there were plans for an immigration bill which would enable the government to end the free movement of EU nationals into the UK, but still allow the country to attract “the brightest and the best”. She also stated that the bill would require EU nationals and their families to be “subject to relevant UK law”. This seems to suggest that we can expect to see a skills-based immigration system for EU workers following Brexit. Reading in between the lines, it also seems we can expect those EU nationals already working in the UK to be allowed to remain, if they choose to do so. However, those who choose to do so will be subject exclusively to UK law, and not enjoy the protections afforded by the European Court of Justice. Presumably this would work along the lines of Norway’s membership of the single market.

Currently EU nationals in the UK are advised to apply for permanent residency if they meet the qualifying criteria. The thinking being that this may be sufficient to secure their stay in the UK after Brexit. Theresa May is in Brussels for Brexit talks today, where she is set to address EU leaders on her plans for those 3 million EU nationals currently residing in the UK, and the 1 million UK citizens currently residing elsewhere in Europe. We understand that full details of her plans will be published on Monday, ending the uncertainty that currently hangs over those who have exercised their right to freedom of movement, and over their employers.

Slowly getting there – what might immigration look like after Brexit?

Shared parental pay – equal rights for fathers in sex discrimination claim

In Ali v. Capita Customer Management Ltd, the employment tribunal upheld a father’s claim of sex discrimination on the basis that his employer’s policies gave fathers on shared parental leave fewer rights to full pay than mothers on maternity leave.

Under Capita’s family-friendly policies, female employees were entitled to the option of 14 weeks’ full pay on maternity leave, while fathers were entitled to two weeks’ full pay on paternity and shared parental leave. This created particular difficulties for Mr Ali. His wife, who had intended to take maternity leave, suffered from post-natal depression and was advised by her doctors to return to work in order to recover from it.

Mr Ali asked Capita whether he could take leave to look after their child instead. Capita responded that he could take shared parental leave but would only be entitled to statutory pay, not full pay. As a consequence, Mr Ali decided not to take shared parental leave, but took other types of leave instead. His problems were then compounded by a line manager who did not appreciate how to appropriately handle an employee in a sensitive situation such as that of Mr Ali.

The tribunal held that Mr Ali was subjected to direct sex discrimination, since a female comparator in the equivalent situation would have been entitled to full pay. Capita plans to appeal the case to the EAT, referring to other cases where the EAT has supported enhanced payment rights for female employees over male employees while on leave.

As a first instance tribunal decision, this is not binding. We would recommend that employers await some appellant authority on the issue before making any changes to their existing shared parental leave policies.

Shared parental pay – equal rights for fathers in sex discrimination claim

The zero-hours contract debate: is the end in sight?

It was reported yesterday that McDonald’s is set to offer employment contracts containing fixed hours to its 115,000 employees employed under zero-hours contracts. This follows a trial offer across 23 restaurants, following which 20% of employees at those restaurants elected to switch to contracts containing fixed working hours.

McDonald’s 115,000 zero-hours employees represent a significant proportion of the 905,000 that the Office of National Statistics reported last month were employed on zero-hours contracts for their main job between October and December 2016. This, therefore, is a significant move. It remains to be seen how many of the 115,000 will in fact take up the offer of fixed hours. However, the 20% figure from the trial suggests that the debate over zero-hours contracts is not over yet – it is notable that 80% of those included in the trial elected to stay on zero-hours contracts (although we do not know how the terms otherwise compared).

What is clear (and has been for some time now) is that, disregarding the benefits of zero-hours contracts for employers, whilst many employees prefer the certainty and security of contracts containing fixed hours, many value the flexibility of a zero-hours working arrangement. It seems McDonald’s has now found a way of putting this debate to bed within their organisation, by giving staff the ability to choose between the two, but otherwise it remains on-going. Research by the Trade Union Congress, also released yesterday, has found that the number of employees in the UK in insecure employment (including, but not limited to, zero-hours contracts) continues to grow.

Perhaps the solution McDonald’s has found would help address the debate elsewhere. It may be that the answer is not to ban zero-hours contracts but to change the law so that all employees who would otherwise be given zero-hours contracts, are offered the choice of a zero-hours arrangement, or a fixed hours arrangement on comparable terms. This is certainly something that larger employers, at least, may want to consider. For now though, the debate looks set to rumble on.

The zero-hours contract debate: is the end in sight?