1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar

The suspension of a teacher alleged to have used unreasonable force with pupils was not a repudiatory breach of contract.

In the recent case of Mayor and Burgesses of the London Borough of Lambeth v. Agoreyo [2019] EWCA Civ 322, the Court of Appeal was asked to consider whether the suspension of a primary school teacher pending an investigation into alleged misconduct amounted to a repudiatory breach of the implied term of trust and confidence.
Read more »
The suspension of a teacher alleged to have used unreasonable force with pupils was not a repudiatory breach of contract.

What is the IR35 regime and why does it matter?

The IR35 regime was introduced by HMRC to avoid individual contractors escaping paying tax as an employee by operating through a personal service company.
Read more »
What is the IR35 regime and why does it matter?

The latest on employment/worker status

In the latest decision on employment status, an Employment Tribunal has held that a group of "Educators" conducting tours, sessions and courses for schools and other visitors to the National Gallery (the Gallery), as well as providing sessions in the community, are workers and not self-employed "freelancers" as the Gallery had long categorised them.
Read more »
The latest on employment/worker status

The gender pay gap – new guidance issued to help organisations close the gap

According to the Office for National Statistics, as at June 2018, the national gender pay gap (GPG) stood at 18.4 per cent as an average across all employees. The Government Equalities Office (GEO) has reported that closing this gap will not be a "quick fix" but that reducing the GPG has become a priority for more companies than ever before. With that in mind, the GEO has published two pieces of guidance to support employers so they can recognise and address their GPG.
Read more »
The gender pay gap – new guidance issued to help organisations close the gap

Companies to tackle sexual harassment with new #MeToo app

In order to investigate claims of sexual harassment and ensure employees are adequately protected, some companies are seeking innovative ways to try to improve their workplace culture. Recently this has included investing in #MeToo apps. These apps are intended to allow employees to discreetly report instances of sexual harassment.
Read more »
Companies to tackle sexual harassment with new #MeToo app

Disability discrimination: EAT clarifies definition of “long-term” disability

In Nissa v. Waverly Education Foundation, the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) clarified the definition of "disability" under the Equality Act 2010.
Read more »
Disability discrimination: EAT clarifies definition of “long-term” disability

No discrimination if dismissal based on religious beliefs of employer

In Gan Menachem Hendon Ltd -v- de Groen,the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) held that dismissing an employee, who refused to lie about living with her boyfriend, from a nursery that ran in accordance with ultra-orthodox Jewish values did not amount to discrimination on the grounds of religion or belief.
Read more »
No discrimination if dismissal based on religious beliefs of employer

Leading people – Acas publishes guidance for effective leadership

Acas has this month published new guidance on leadership – Leading people, which is designed to be used in conjunction with its comprehensive guidance on Managing people, issued in 2016.
Read more »
Leading people – Acas publishes guidance for effective leadership

Is it automatically unfair to dismiss someone because they allege that they will be dismissed unfairly?

In Spaceman v. ISS Mediclean Ltd t/a ISS Facility Service Healthcare the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) considered the circumstances in which an employee is dismissed for the automatically unfair reason of asserting infringement of a statutory right.
Read more »
Is it automatically unfair to dismiss someone because they allege that they will be dismissed unfairly?

The Good Work Plan delivers some good news for work-seekers

The latest statutory instrument coming out of the Good Work Plan, The Conduct of Employment Agencies and Employment Businesses (Amendment) Regulations 2019 has been laid before Parliament. This is the government's attempt to address the recommendation from the Taylor Review that information available to workers should be more transparent, particularly when it comes to pay.
Read more »
The Good Work Plan delivers some good news for work-seekers