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Unfair Dismissal: extending the date of dismissal by the statutory notice period

The recent case of Lancaster & Duke v. Wileman is a useful reminder to employers that terminating an employee's employment in the week before they gain two years' continuous service may still enable an employee to claim that they have the requisite qualifying service to bring a claim for ordinary unfair dismissal.
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Unfair Dismissal: extending the date of dismissal by the statutory notice period

Acas Annual Report

Acas has issued its first annual report since the July 2017 Supreme Court judgment declaring employment tribunal fees unlawful (a previous blog post on the possible effects of that decision can be found here).
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Acas Annual Report

Government proposes major overhaul of Gender Recognition Act

The Government Equality Office (GEO) is proposing reform of the Gender Recognition Act 2004. This Act enables transgender people to obtain legal recognition of their acquired gender by the issuing of a Gender Recognition Certificate and changing the sex on their birth certificate.
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Government proposes major overhaul of Gender Recognition Act

Migrants’ rights in the spotlight

Brexit is thought to be one of the reasons why the Tier 2 (General) restricted Certificate of Sponsorship cap has been reached. However, we may at last be seeing some reprieve from this.
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Migrants’ rights in the spotlight

Kilraine v London Borough of Wandsworth [2018]

A recent case has considered the issue of what amounts to a protected disclosure. In Kilraine v. London Borough of Wandsworth [2018], the Court of Appeal guided Employment Tribunals in such cases to focus on determining whether there was a "protected disclosure" and whether the disclosed information, showed or tended to show that one or more of the six specified types of malpractice had taken place or was likely to take place – for example a breach of a legal obligation.
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Kilraine v London Borough of Wandsworth [2018]

Pay gap between younger and older workers

The pay gap between the under-30s and over-30s has risen by more than half in the last 20 years, as younger workers are still enduring the residual effects of the financial crisis.
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Pay gap between younger and older workers

Are we getting closer to gender equality?

With the recent focus on pay gap reporting and the #MeToo campaign, Helen Jenkins reflects on the progress being made, both in Britain and globally, in a new People Management article.

Click here to read the article.

Are we getting closer to gender equality?

2020 women on board target – FTSE 350 companies urged by the government to step up

The target, as set by the Hampton-Alexander Review, is for 33 per cent of FTSE board positions to be held by women by the end of 2020. Yesterday BEIS and the Government Equalities Office published a press release looking at the progress made against this target (the Press Release).
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2020 women on board target – FTSE 350 companies urged by the government to step up

Supreme Court hears Barnardo’s RPI/CPI Appeal

Dentons' Reward team are advising the Representative Beneficiaries of the Barnardo's Staff Pension Scheme ("the Scheme") in an application to the Supreme Court to decide whether the Scheme rules permit a switch from RPI to CPI for revaluation or indexation of pension payments.
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Supreme Court hears Barnardo’s RPI/CPI Appeal

Can the menopause constitute a disability?

A recent Employment Tribunal's ruling suggests that the physical and psychological effects of the menopause could constitute a disability for the purposes of the Equality Act 2010 (the 2010 Act) Ms Davies, a court officer for the Scottish Courts and Tribunal Service, had experienced the onset of the menopause resulting in her becoming severely anaemic, stressed and anxious, and experiencing memory loss.
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Can the menopause constitute a disability?