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How to be transparent about your gender pay gap reporting

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How to be transparent about your gender pay gap reporting

World Braille Day 2018

4th January 2018 is World Braille Day. Braille is the system of touch reading and writing that utilises raised dots to represent the letters of the print alphabet and uses symbols to represent punctuation, mathematics and scientific characters, music, computer notation, and foreign languages. Rather than a language, Braille is a code by which all languages may be written and read. Through the use of Braille, people who are blind or visually impaired are able to review and study the written word. For those who use Braille, it is an important tool allowing them to engage with the rest of the workforce and enjoy equal opportunity with other, non visually impaired, work colleagues.
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World Braille Day 2018

Simple steps to keep your workforce healthy

Please read Gina Unterhalter's article for People Management here...
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Simple steps to keep your workforce healthy

Risk assessments for breastfeeding mothers

The European Court of Justice (CJEU) has held, in the recent case of Otero Ramos v Servicio Galego de Saude, that failure to conduct an appropriate risk assessment for a breastfeeding employee amounts to sex discrimination.

The employee in this case was an accident and emergency nurse who had made a request for an adjustment to her working pattern on account of her breastfeeding. Her concerns included the complex shift rotation system, exposure to ionising radiation, healthcare-associated infections and stress. She requested an adjusted shift pattern and preventative measures to be implemented. Her employer issued a report stating that her work did not pose any risk to her breastfeeding her child and rejected her request for an adjustment to her working conditions.

The employee filed a claim for sex discrimination against her employer, alleging that the risk assessment carried out by her employer did not comply with the requirements of EU law which provides measures to improve health and safety for pregnant and breastfeeding workers. The CJEU found that the employer had failed to perform an individual assessment of the employee’s circumstances, as required under the legislation, and rather it had conducted an assessment of the employee’s role as an accident and emergency nurse.

Accordingly, the CJEU held that failure to properly assess the risk posed by the work of a breastfeeding worker in accordance with the requirements of EU law must be regarded as less favourable treatment and constitutes direct sex discrimination.

Risk assessments for breastfeeding mothers

Parental bereavement leave bill published by the government

On 13 October 2017, the government published the Parental Bereavement (Pay and Leave) Bill. This will offer two weeks' paid leave to any employed parent who loses a child under the age of 18.
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Parental bereavement leave bill published by the government

The Repeal Bill – Workers’ Rights

On 7 September 2017 the government published a factsheet on the impact of the Repeal Bill, which was recently passed by a majority of MPs, and the future status of workers' rights following the UK's withdrawal from the EU.
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The Repeal Bill – Workers’ Rights

People Management article, featuring Michael Bronstein

As you may have seen, People Management recently published an article on some of the big developments in employment law in 2017, particularly Brexit and the Taylor review. The discussion featured Michael Bronstein, a partner here at Dentons. Michael gave some insight on the potential effects of withdrawing from the EU on employment legislation, acknowledging that there is 'a common misconception that all employment rights are created by the EU'. In the lead up to triggering Article 50, the government maintained that there would not be any change to workers' rights following Brexit, so it would be brave to take away key protections, many of which derive from UK law anyway. Other commentators suggested there may be reforms to TUPE, although agreed that it will stay, but perhaps in a slightly amended form. As for a new visa regime for workers, the outcome is unclear. The uncertainty has already caused many workers to leave at a time where we are beginning to see a shortage of labour. This has not been helped by the recent leaked Home Office post-Brexit Immigration Policy which has confirmed the fears of employers with respect to the future of EU workers in the UK.
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People Management article, featuring Michael Bronstein

Leaked Home Office post-Brexit Immigration Policy

As many of you will have seen, the Home Office's draft Post-Brexit Immigration Policy was leaked this week, and has since become a topic of much interest. The document has caused concern among many employers, as the stricter controls being proposed on EU immigration could lead to a significant shortage of labour in the UK, which could be hugely damaging to the economy. EU nationals currently comprise around 7% of the overall workforce in UK, with certain sectors almost entirely dependant on their contribution.
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Leaked Home Office post-Brexit Immigration Policy

Safeguarding mental health: essential for your construction workers, good for your business

The UK’s mental health is currently under scrutiny with high profile dignitaries, businessmen and organisations all helping to raise awareness of the problems it can cause in the workplace. Many campaigners come from the construction industry – an industry not renowned for its workers’ empathy and compassion. Like diversity in the construction industry, which we commented on last month, mental health has, traditionally, been one of those topics everyone avoids both on and off site. But this is not a new topic for construction: back in 2014, Building considered why talking about mental health is taboo in construction. Building focused on the hidden health and safety risks that mental health problems pose in the workplace which can be just as serious a threat to workers as physical injuries and fatalities.

Click here for the full article from our Construction team: https://www.dentons.com/en/insights/articles/2017/march/15/safeguarding-mental-health-essential-for-your-construction-workers-good-for-your-business

 

Safeguarding mental health: essential for your construction workers, good for your business

Dealing with personal relationships in the workplace

It has recently been reported in the press that John Neal, the CEO of the Australian headquartered insurance and reinsurance company QBE, had his annual bonus cut by twenty per cent (which equated to AU$550,000 or £340,000) for failing to disclose a personal relationship with his executive assistant. The decision to cut his bonus was taken despite what QBE described as a “commendable year [during which he] delivered a strong full year result”.  It has been reported that Mr Neal’s executive assistant was also executive assistant to the board.  QBE requires executives to disclose workplace relationships under its executive code of conduct.

Workplace relationships are common. Employees necessarily spend significant time together, and in many cases will have common interests.  Some employers view these relationships as a positive.  For example, one of the UK’s largest independent travel agencies is known to have produced well in excess of 100 marriages.  However, workplace relationships can be a distraction, can fuel gossip and can sometimes complicate decision making.  To be clear as to their expectations, employers should consider the circumstances in which workplace relationships may be inappropriate, and may wish to put in place a policy on them.  Any policy should strike a balance between an employee’s right to a private life, and the employer’s right to protect its business interests.  In most cases, this is likely to include a requirement that an employee discloses any workplace relationship that may give rise to a conflict of interest or a breach of confidentiality.  It should also be made clear to employees that they must not allow personal relationships to influence their conduct in the workplace.

Mr Neal’s case is an extreme example.  As CEO, he was clearly obliged under the executive code of conduct to disclose any personal relationship with a colleague.  Mr Neal has himself admitted that he did not do this, and that he could see that it might cause damage to the company’s reputation.  It is important to remember that the issue here was not the relationship itself so much as Mr Neal’s failure to abide by the code of conduct, and disclose it.  Whilst it has been reported that Mr Neal’s executive assistant has decided to leave QBE, it is understood that no action was taken against her, presumably because she was not subject to the code of conduct.  It is unlikely to be appropriate for employers to take steps to reduce bonuses, or take disciplinary action against an employee, simply for having a personal relationship with a colleague.  Such steps may be appropriate though, where an employer has a policy on workplace relationships which an employee deliberately disregards.  As always, when making a decision to reduce a bonus payment in any circumstances, an employer should consider whether the terms of the bonus scheme allow it to do this.  Failure to do so might lead to a claim for unlawful deduction from wages, or breach of contract.  The specific terms of the bonus scheme which applied to Mr Neal are not known.

Dealing with personal relationships in the workplace