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Eid al-Adha: dealing with religious festivals in the workplace

Eid al-Adha (known as the festival of sacrifice), the Islamic holiday marking the end of the Hajj pilgrimage, is due to begin this coming Tuesday (21 August). The festival is celebrated with prayer and feast, typically on a large scale with Muslims in their respective communities coming together to partake in the festivities. Many Muslims may request time off work to celebrate Eid al-Adha, so here are a few considerations for employers to bear in mind as the holiday approaches.
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Eid al-Adha: dealing with religious festivals in the workplace

Pay gap between younger and older workers

The pay gap between the under-30s and over-30s has risen by more than half in the last 20 years, as younger workers are still enduring the residual effects of the financial crisis.
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Pay gap between younger and older workers

“Pitiful” and “patronising” – the excuses given for the lack of female presence in FTSE boardrooms

The Hampton-Alexander Review, an independent review backed by the government to scrutinise the gender balance of boards at the top of the country's leading companies, released a report this week which lists some of the excuses given by companies for a lack of female representation on their boards.
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“Pitiful” and “patronising” – the excuses given for the lack of female presence in FTSE boardrooms

A busy month for discrimination law

It’s been a busy few weeks for judgments; we round up the most recent discrimination cases:

When is cancer a disability?

What happens if an employer does not know an employee is pregnant when deciding to dismiss her but finds out before the dismissal takes effect?

Was forfeiture of LTIP awards unlawful age discrimination?

Click here to read the round up.

A busy month for discrimination law

UK Employment Law Round-up – March 2018

In this issue we look at some of the key employment law developments that have been taking place over the past month. In our case law review we take a look at ‘deemed disabilities’ under the Equality Act following a recent EAT judgment. We also look at what happens if an employer does not know an employee is pregnant when deciding to dismiss but finds out before the dismissal takes effect. The impact of the new taxation of termination payments coming into force from 6 April 2018 and the sponsor licence reporting process to be mindful of when involved in mergers and acquisitions are also covered.

https://www.dentons.com/en/insights/newsletters/2018/march/29/uk-employment-law-roundup/uk-employment-law-round-up-march-2018

UK Employment Law Round-up – March 2018

Don’t forget to sign up to our May 2018 annual update and diversity seminar

Don’t forget to sign up to our May 2018 annual update and diversity seminar

‘Egregiously unfair’ dismissal costs employer £30,000

The employer, Michelin, dismissed their employee who was signed off with stress.
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‘Egregiously unfair’ dismissal costs employer £30,000

Surveillance of employees in the workplace and the Article 8 right to privacy

Advances in technology have made monitoring employees easier than ever before. With the increased use of email, smartphones, laptops, trackers and SmartWare, almost every mode of communication has gone digital. As such, it is now possible to monitor your employees’ every movement and communication, to find out not just where they are but also how productive they are being.

However, many employees try to argue that this monitoring is an intrusion on their right to a private life (under Article 8 of the Human Rights Act) and is therefore unlawful.

This important issue has been the focus of two recent decisions by the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR). In each case, the judges considered the limits on what is and isn’t permissible when it comes to the surveillance of employees.

Read more here.

Surveillance of employees in the workplace and the Article 8 right to privacy

Government’s response to Taylor Review

Seven months ago, we reported on the Taylor Review of modern working practices, with its focus on “good work” for all that is “fair and decent”. In short, the review recommended extra protection for the UK workforce, ranging from clarity over employment status to extra rights on zero-hours contracts. This month the government has published its eagerly anticipated response to Matthew Taylor’s 53 recommendations.

Read more here.

Government’s response to Taylor Review

Simple steps to keep your workforce healthy

Please read Gina Unterhalter's article for People Management here...
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Simple steps to keep your workforce healthy