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EAT finds you cannot cherry pick from without prejudice conversations

The Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT), in the recent case of Graham v. Agilitas IT Solutions Ltd. (Agilitas), ruled that an employer cannot rely on parts of a without prejudice conversation held in accordance with s.111A of the Employment Rights Act 1996 (ERA) and/or the "common law" without prejudice rule, whilst at the same time seeking to use the without prejudice rule as a shield in reference to that same conversation. S.111A of the ERA permits discussions between an employer and an employee with a view to terminating employment on agreed terms to remain confidential and inadmissible in proceedings before a tribunal for unfair dismissal.
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EAT finds you cannot cherry pick from without prejudice conversations

Social media: the opportunities and the risks

Find out more about the latest social media/employment law cross-over case law, and the importance of having a social media policy in place, in my latest article for People Management.

http://www2.cipd.co.uk/pm/peoplemanagement/b/weblog/archive/2017/10/23/what-does-case-law-say-about-social-media.aspx

Social media: the opportunities and the risks

Suspension for alleged misconduct may be a breach of contract

In the recent case of Agoreyo v. London Borough of Lambeth [2017] EWHC 2019 (QB), the High Court has held that suspension as a "knee-jerk" reaction to an allegation of misconduct may in itself be sufficient to breach the implied contractual term of trust and confidence.
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Suspension for alleged misconduct may be a breach of contract

Tribunal awards £2 for employer’s refusal of unsuitable companion at disciplinary hearing

Mr Gnahoua was a bus driver at Abellio London Ltd (Abellio). He was dismissed for gross misconduct at a disciplinary hearing. On appeal, Mr Gnahoua told Abellio that he wished to be accompanied by two brothers, who had formed the PTSC union, of which Mr Gnahoua was also a member. Abellio refused this request stating it had banned the brothers from representing its staff at hearings due to their “threatening behaviour” and “dishonesty”. Therefore, Mr Gnahoua attended the appeal unrepresented and the decision to dismiss him was upheld.

Mr Gnahoua subsequently brought various claims in the tribunal, which included that Abellio had denied him the opportunity to be accompanied at his disciplinary appeal hearing. The employment tribunal accepted that, by refusing to allow the two brothers to attend the appeal, Abellio was in breach of Mr Gnahoua’s statutory right to be accompanied. Notwithstanding this finding, the tribunal accepted that Abellio had “strong grounds” for refusing Mr Gnahoua’s choice of companion. It also appreciated that Mr Gnahoua had not suffered any loss because of the breach because Abellio had conducted the appeal hearing in a fair and thorough manner. Therefore, the tribunal considered that a nominal award of £2 was appropriate in the circumstances.

The full case report can be found here: Mr M Gnahoua v. Abellio London Ltd 

Tribunal awards £2 for employer’s refusal of unsuitable companion at disciplinary hearing