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Court of appeal rules that gender segregation at school amounts to unlawful discrimination

In the recent case of HMCI v. The Interim Executive Board of Al-Hijrah School, the Court of Appeal overturned the High Court's finding that a school's complete gender segregation of pupils from year five onwards was not direct sex discrimination.
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Court of appeal rules that gender segregation at school amounts to unlawful discrimination

Landmark legal battle that could prevent women earning less than men in the UK

The latest hearing in the UK's largest ever private sector equal pay claim is due to kick off today, in a case that could eventually see around 15,000 predominantly female Asda workers recovering well over £100m in pay.
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Landmark legal battle that could prevent women earning less than men in the UK

Ethnicity Facts and Figures

On Tuesday 10 October 2017, the Government launched a new website – Ethnicity Facts and Figures – the aim of which is to challenge society to “explain or change” disparities in how people from different ethnic backgrounds are treated.
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Ethnicity Facts and Figures

Choice words

The case of Ms Carolina Gomes v. Henworth Limited t/a Winkworth Estate Agents & anor. serves as a useful reminder to be careful when selecting your choice of words when talking to employees.
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Choice words

President of the Employment Tribunals announces increase in the Vento Bands

Following a recent consultation, the President of the Employment Tribunals has announced a rise in the compensation that employees can recover for 'injury to feelings', in the event that they suffer from discrimination in the workplace.
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President of the Employment Tribunals announces increase in the Vento Bands

Be careful when quoting from the Bible …

In the recent decision of Trayhorn v. The Secretary of State for Justice the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) held that a prison had not indirectly discriminated against a chaplain who was disciplined for quoting Bible passages condemning homosexuality.
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Be careful when quoting from the Bible …

Add 10 per cent to discrimination compensation awards?

From April 2013, as a result of the Court of Appeal case Simmons v. Castle, there was a 10 per cent increase in general damages for non-monetary losses. This was the Court of Appeal’s implementation of one of the Jackson reforms, namely the recommendation from Lord Justice Jackson that there should be such an uplift in order to help claimants meet the additional costs and risks as a result of his other recommendation to abolish recoverability of conditional fee agreement success fees and after-the-event insurance premiums.

Up until De Souza v. Vinci Construction (UK) Ltd it was not clear whether such an uplift should apply to employment tribunal cases, given that the rationale for the uplift does not apply in the Employment Tribunal. However, employers should take note that the Court of Appeal yesterday decided in De Souza that such an uplift should indeed apply in the Employment Tribunal. The Court noted that s124(6) of the Equality Act 2010 requires that compensation awarded in the County Court and the Tribunals should be consistent. Therefore, compensation for employment discrimination should be the same as that which could be awarded for a non-employment discrimination claim (e.g. discrimination in an educational context) in the County Court.

The Court of Appeal provided some guidance in De Souza as to how the uplift should be applied. Unfortunately it does not appear that it is always as simple as adding 10 per cent. Notably the court stated that in relation to psychiatric injury, the current Judicial College Guidelines already incorporate the 10 per cent uplift, so there would be no change in this regard. However, in relation to injury to feelings the position is more complicated. The Vento bands of compensation for injury to feelings could have a 10 per cent uplift applied to them. However, we will not have any certainty until new bands are published (the Court of Appeal suggested that the President of the Employment Appeal Tribunal publish guidance setting out new bands for clarity, given that the bands were recently updated to reflect inflationary changes).

Add 10 per cent to discrimination compensation awards?

Older and wiser?

After a call from Andy Briggs, the government’s champion for older workers to increase the number of mature workers by 12% by 2022, a group of businesses: Aviva, Atos, Barclays, the Co-operative Group, Home Instead Senior Care, the Financial Services Compensation Scheme, Mercer and Walgreens Boots Alliance, have publically committed to tackling a potential skills gap by recruiting more individuals over 50 years old. Both transparency and target setting are quite fashionable at present following gender pay reporting. However, whether there will be any real development in this area remains to be seen. With Brexit on the horizon, and uncertainty about any restrictions on free movement, the pool of home-grown talent in their 50’s and older should sensibly be considered. Notwithstanding this, there is some tension between this drive and the March 2017 Advocate General’s opinion in the European case of Fries v. Lufthansa CityLine GmbH C-190/16 that an age limit of 65 imposed on EU commercial pilots is not discriminatory. In that case the Advocate General felt that the age limit was both appropriate and necessary to achieve the aim of air traffic safety. He said that there could hardly be any question that capability declined with age. For many working in non safety critical areas employers should be able to manage capability issues by pro-actively applying their capability processes at an early stage.

Older and wiser?

Sisters doing it for themselves?

The world of work is changing. According to a combined study by Oxford Ecomonics and the online retailer notonthehighstreet.com, female entrepreneurs are leading the way in shunning normal working hours. Many have set up their own businesses in an attempt to juggle home and work commitments. They enjoy having flexibility to juggle home and work life, without reverting to part time work and a consequent reduction in their finances. Employers are advised to think about how they can adapt to changing work habits to recruit and retain the best talent.

The full report can be found here http://www.notonthehighstreetpresscentre.com/wp-content/uploads/Noths_Report_Release_London.pdf

Sisters doing it for themselves?

Transparency: Business champion calls for the publication of age data

Transparency seems to be the goal. The gender pay gap reporting obligations came into force on 6 April 2017. The Liberal Democrats have called for mandatory reporting on ethnicity pay gap. Now, Andy Briggs, the Government’s business champion for older workers, has called for organisations to publish age data, and to sign up to a “Commit & Publish” pledge to secure at least a million more employees over the age of 50 in the workplace by 2022. This is a target increase of 12 per cent and is proposed in response to an apparent skills gap in the economy.

A number of employers have already agreed to the pledge, including Aviva, Atos, Barclays and the Cooperative Group.

Employers should start to consider the logistics of wider data collection and analysis obligations, the potential reputational and legal risks of failing to report, and any associated litigation risks of analysis exposing a wide pay gap or statistics highlighting a skewed workforce in terms of age.

Transparency: Business champion calls for the publication of age data