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The latest on employment/worker status

In the latest decision on employment status, an Employment Tribunal has held that a group of "Educators" conducting tours, sessions and courses for schools and other visitors to the National Gallery (the Gallery), as well as providing sessions in the community, are workers and not self-employed "freelancers" as the Gallery had long categorised them.
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The latest on employment/worker status

Government’s Good Work Plan: a step closer to implementation of Taylor Review recommendations?

Following the Taylor 2017 Review and the subsequent consultations launched earlier this year, the government has now published the Good Work Plan (the Plan). The Plan sets out its proposals for implementing the recommendations of the Taylor Review and "a wide range of policy and legislative changes" dealing with worker status, agency workers and zero hours contracts.
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Government’s Good Work Plan: a step closer to implementation of Taylor Review recommendations?

Part-time workers: hours -v- pay

The Court of Appeal has agreed with the lower courts that a part-time cabin crew member had been treated less favourably than a full-time crew member, because she had to be available for work 53.5% of the year but was only paid 50% of the full-time salary (British Airways plc v Pinaud).
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Part-time workers: hours -v- pay

Addison Lee drivers found to be workers: what can we learn from the latest case on worker status?

Barely a week goes by without worker status finding its way back into the headlines. The EAT this week upheld a tribunal's decision that three private hire drivers engaged by Addison Lee, which offers various transport services, are workers. The EAT confirmed the tribunal's ability to look beyond the contract in place to the reality of the working arrangements and endorsed the adoption of a "realistic and worldly-wise" approach.
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Addison Lee drivers found to be workers: what can we learn from the latest case on worker status?

Zero hours contracts and full-time permanent contracts: not always so different

In the recent case of Roddis v Sheffield Hallam University, the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) found that an employee on a zero hours contract could compare himself to a colleague on a full-time contract for the purposes of bringing a claim for less favourable treatment under the Part-Time Workers (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2000 (the PTW Regulations).
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Zero hours contracts and full-time permanent contracts: not always so different

The Apprenticeship Levy, has it worked?

The Apprenticeship Levy has now been in force for a year. The government's aim in introducing the Levy was to reverse the decline in the use of apprenticeships by ring fencing funds which would be set aside in order to tackle skills shortages. One year on, has it worked?
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The Apprenticeship Levy, has it worked?

Government’s response to Taylor Review

Seven months ago, we reported on the Taylor Review of modern working practices, with its focus on “good work” for all that is “fair and decent”. In short, the review recommended extra protection for the UK workforce, ranging from clarity over employment status to extra rights on zero-hours contracts. This month the government has published its eagerly anticipated response to Matthew Taylor’s 53 recommendations.

Read more here.

Government’s response to Taylor Review

Managing a flexible workforce

With Christmas on the way (a busy time of year in many sectors – including hospitality) Big Hospitality has published our article on three key ways to manage a flexible workforce.  Please do have a read here – the principles can be applied to other types of flexible workforce too.

Managing a flexible workforce

Uber loses appeal on worker status

In the continuing worker status saga, Uber's recent appeal against the Tribunal ruling that its drivers are workers, rather than self-employed individuals, has been dismissed by the EAT.
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Uber loses appeal on worker status

People Management article

As you may have seen, People Management recently published an article on some of the big developments in employment law in 2017, particularly Brexit and the Taylor review. In the lead up to triggering Article 50, the government maintained that there would not be any change to workers' rights following Brexit, so it would be brave to take away key protections, many of which derive from UK law anyway. Other commentators suggested there may be reforms to TUPE, although agreed that it will stay, but perhaps in a slightly amended form. As for a new visa regime for workers, the outcome is unclear. The uncertainty has already caused many workers to leave at a time where we are beginning to see a shortage of labour. This has not been helped by the recent leaked Home Office post-Brexit Immigration Policy which has confirmed the fears of employers with respect to the future of EU workers in the UK.
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People Management article