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Will Yodel couriers be forgotten in a no-deal Brexit?

With interesting timing, the Watford Employment Tribunal (ET) has referred a number of questions to the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU). The ET has asked the CJEU to clarify whether, where there is a contractual right to substitute, an individual can properly be classed as a "worker".
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Will Yodel couriers be forgotten in a no-deal Brexit?

Employee or worker status – the diagnosis of a doctor

In Community Based Care Health Ltd v. Narayan UKEAT/0162/18, the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) has characterised a GP as a worker under the Employment Rights Act 1996.
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Employee or worker status – the diagnosis of a doctor

Holiday pay entitlement for part-year employees – not a simple 12.07% of hours worked

In the recent case of Harpur Trust v. Brazel [2019] EWCA Civ 1402, the Court of Appeal considered whether the holiday entitlement of a permanent employee who worked only part of the year should be prorated to that of a full-year worker.
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Holiday pay entitlement for part-year employees – not a simple 12.07% of hours worked

EU developments: what new measures might we see on workers’ rights?

The EU Council has had a busy month, adopting two new directives which will strengthen employees' rights. It also adopted a regulation which will establish a European Labour Authority, to support compliance and enforcement in the areas of labour mobility and social security coordination.
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EU developments: what new measures might we see on workers’ rights?

The latest on employment/worker status

In the latest decision on employment status, an Employment Tribunal has held that a group of "Educators" conducting tours, sessions and courses for schools and other visitors to the National Gallery (the Gallery), as well as providing sessions in the community, are workers and not self-employed "freelancers" as the Gallery had long categorised them.
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The latest on employment/worker status

Government’s Good Work Plan: a step closer to implementation of Taylor Review recommendations?

Following the Taylor 2017 Review and the subsequent consultations launched earlier this year, the government has now published the Good Work Plan (the Plan). The Plan sets out its proposals for implementing the recommendations of the Taylor Review and "a wide range of policy and legislative changes" dealing with worker status, agency workers and zero hours contracts.
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Government’s Good Work Plan: a step closer to implementation of Taylor Review recommendations?

Part-time workers: hours -v- pay

The Court of Appeal has agreed with the lower courts that a part-time cabin crew member had been treated less favourably than a full-time crew member, because she had to be available for work 53.5% of the year but was only paid 50% of the full-time salary (British Airways plc v Pinaud).
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Part-time workers: hours -v- pay

Addison Lee drivers found to be workers: what can we learn from the latest case on worker status?

Barely a week goes by without worker status finding its way back into the headlines. The EAT this week upheld a tribunal's decision that three private hire drivers engaged by Addison Lee, which offers various transport services, are workers. The EAT confirmed the tribunal's ability to look beyond the contract in place to the reality of the working arrangements and endorsed the adoption of a "realistic and worldly-wise" approach.
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Addison Lee drivers found to be workers: what can we learn from the latest case on worker status?

Zero hours contracts and full-time permanent contracts: not always so different

In the recent case of Roddis v Sheffield Hallam University, the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) found that an employee on a zero hours contract could compare himself to a colleague on a full-time contract for the purposes of bringing a claim for less favourable treatment under the Part-Time Workers (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2000 (the PTW Regulations).
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Zero hours contracts and full-time permanent contracts: not always so different

The Apprenticeship Levy, has it worked?

The Apprenticeship Levy has now been in force for a year. The government's aim in introducing the Levy was to reverse the decline in the use of apprenticeships by ring fencing funds which would be set aside in order to tackle skills shortages. One year on, has it worked?
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The Apprenticeship Levy, has it worked?