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Zero hours contracts and full-time permanent contracts: not always so different

In the recent case of Roddis v Sheffield Hallam University, the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) found that an employee on a zero hours contract could compare himself to a colleague on a full-time contract for the purposes of bringing a claim for less favourable treatment under the Part-Time Workers (Prevention of Less Favourable Treatment) Regulations 2000 (the PTW Regulations).
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Zero hours contracts and full-time permanent contracts: not always so different

The Apprenticeship Levy, has it worked?

The Apprenticeship Levy has now been in force for a year. The government's aim in introducing the Levy was to reverse the decline in the use of apprenticeships by ring fencing funds which would be set aside in order to tackle skills shortages. One year on, has it worked?
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The Apprenticeship Levy, has it worked?

Government’s response to Taylor Review

Seven months ago, we reported on the Taylor Review of modern working practices, with its focus on “good work” for all that is “fair and decent”. In short, the review recommended extra protection for the UK workforce, ranging from clarity over employment status to extra rights on zero-hours contracts. This month the government has published its eagerly anticipated response to Matthew Taylor’s 53 recommendations.

Read more here.

Government’s response to Taylor Review

Managing a flexible workforce

With Christmas on the way (a busy time of year in many sectors – including hospitality) Big Hospitality has published our article on three key ways to manage a flexible workforce.  Please do have a read here – the principles can be applied to other types of flexible workforce too.

Managing a flexible workforce

Uber loses appeal on worker status

In the continuing worker status saga, Uber's recent appeal against the Tribunal ruling that its drivers are workers, rather than self-employed individuals, has been dismissed by the EAT.
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Uber loses appeal on worker status

People Management article, featuring Michael Bronstein

As you may have seen, People Management recently published an article on some of the big developments in employment law in 2017, particularly Brexit and the Taylor review. The discussion featured Michael Bronstein, a partner here at Dentons. Michael gave some insight on the potential effects of withdrawing from the EU on employment legislation, acknowledging that there is 'a common misconception that all employment rights are created by the EU'. In the lead up to triggering Article 50, the government maintained that there would not be any change to workers' rights following Brexit, so it would be brave to take away key protections, many of which derive from UK law anyway. Other commentators suggested there may be reforms to TUPE, although agreed that it will stay, but perhaps in a slightly amended form. As for a new visa regime for workers, the outcome is unclear. The uncertainty has already caused many workers to leave at a time where we are beginning to see a shortage of labour. This has not been helped by the recent leaked Home Office post-Brexit Immigration Policy which has confirmed the fears of employers with respect to the future of EU workers in the UK.
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People Management article, featuring Michael Bronstein

Self-employed contractors and the gig economy – keep watching this space!

Pimlico Plumbers has now been granted permission to appeal to the Supreme Court. The decision reached by the Supreme Court will be significant as the highest authority on the employment status of purportedly self-employed contractors. It is likely to have implications for the so-called "gig economy".
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Self-employed contractors and the gig economy – keep watching this space!

Another triumph for cyclists

Following in the tracks of CitySprint, Deliveroo and Excel, Addison Lee is the latest company to wrongly classify its workforce.
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Another triumph for cyclists

The zero-hours contract debate: is the end in sight?

It was reported yesterday that McDonald’s is set to offer employment contracts containing fixed hours to its 115,000 employees employed under zero-hours contracts. This follows a trial offer across 23 restaurants, following which 20% of employees at those restaurants elected to switch to contracts containing fixed working hours.

McDonald’s 115,000 zero-hours employees represent a significant proportion of the 905,000 that the Office of National Statistics reported last month were employed on zero-hours contracts for their main job between October and December 2016. This, therefore, is a significant move. It remains to be seen how many of the 115,000 will in fact take up the offer of fixed hours. However, the 20% figure from the trial suggests that the debate over zero-hours contracts is not over yet – it is notable that 80% of those included in the trial elected to stay on zero-hours contracts (although we do not know how the terms otherwise compared).

What is clear (and has been for some time now) is that, disregarding the benefits of zero-hours contracts for employers, whilst many employees prefer the certainty and security of contracts containing fixed hours, many value the flexibility of a zero-hours working arrangement. It seems McDonald’s has now found a way of putting this debate to bed within their organisation, by giving staff the ability to choose between the two, but otherwise it remains on-going. Research by the Trade Union Congress, also released yesterday, has found that the number of employees in the UK in insecure employment (including, but not limited to, zero-hours contracts) continues to grow.

Perhaps the solution McDonald’s has found would help address the debate elsewhere. It may be that the answer is not to ban zero-hours contracts but to change the law so that all employees who would otherwise be given zero-hours contracts, are offered the choice of a zero-hours arrangement, or a fixed hours arrangement on comparable terms. This is certainly something that larger employers, at least, may want to consider. For now though, the debate looks set to rumble on.

The zero-hours contract debate: is the end in sight?

Matthew Taylor’s report on the gig economy – emergent themes

Matthew Taylor, former head of Blair’s Number 10 Policy Unit, is due to publish a report on the gig economy this summer. A number of themes have emerged from his interviews and discussions with the press to date.

His report will look at the following issues:

  • Security, pay and rights
  • Progression and training
  • Balance of rights and responsibility
  • Representation
  • Opportunities for under-represented groups
  • New business models

The report will emphasise that it is not just quantity of work that matters but also the quality of work. Mr Taylor wants to ensure there are greater opportunities for progression and fulfilment in the self-employed and worker economy. He wants to strengthen employee voice in the workplace.

His research will recognise that employers want clearer rules on how to determine self-employed, worker and employee status. To that end, it is likely to foreground the idea of the “dependent contractor” (a term currently used in Canadian law) as an indicator of worker status.

His investigations look into a diversity of self-employment roles, and will take account of differences between, for example, the construction and healthcare industries.

Finally the report will also disclose the extent to which tax treatment and social security rights are a big influence on employment trends. We can assume that Matthew Taylor saw the now cancelled tax reforms to self-employed workers as a step in the right direction. Although he cannot make recommendations on tax, he is likely to want to nudge tax treatment in an employee-friendly direction as well as recommend a strengthening of pension entitlements for those working in the gig economy.

Matthew Taylor’s report on the gig economy – emergent themes